Environment

Colorado is home to gorgeous mountains, sweeping plains, and some of the most scenic landscapes in the country. In addition, Colorado has a 150 year history of oil and gas development while preserving our state’s natural beauty. We are one of the leading producers of natural gas, a cleaner burning fuel source that is helping to reduce carbon emissions. Drilling for oil and gas is an industrial process and leaves a small footprint, however, practices such as multi-well pads, employing Best Management Practices (BMPs), and complying with the stringent local, state, and federal regulations helps ensure the protection of Colorado’s environment and natural resources.
Across the U.S., each state has regulatory authority over oil and gas operations. Colorado has some of the most comprehensive and stringent oil and gas regulations in the country: Every aspect of oil and gas activity is regulated from site selection, permitting, down-hole activities, hydraulic fracturing and disclosure, and final site reclamation.

Basics – Air: What are Pollutants and How are They Controlled?

The air emissions surrounding oil and gas development are a complex area of study. Air emissions are regulated by both state and federal statutes, and the required oil and gas emissions controls are subjected to a constantly evolving regulatory environment. There are numerous technologies the oil and gas industry uses to manage air emissions. Oil and gas operations result in emissions, the most of which are volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and nitrogen oxides emissions. These are captured and controlled at the well site by devices that include vapor recovery units, flares, and incinerators. Read More »

Mythbusters:Federal Exemptions

Across the U.S., each state has regulatory over oil and gas operations.  Colorado has some of the most comprehensive and stringent oil and gas regulations in the country:  Every aspect of oil and gas activity is regulated from site selection, permitting, down-hole activities, hydraulic fracturing and disclosure, and final site reclamation. Read More »