Hydraulic Fracturing

Fracking, or hydraulic fracturing, has been used for more than sixty years to extract oil and natural gas deposits from tight rock formations that were once too difficult to produce. Hydraulic fracturing is a proven, traditional technology that involves drilling thousands of feet below the earth’s surface and groundwater supplies. Every well is protected with multiple layers of steel and cement casing and then a mixture of pressurized water, sand, and specially designed compounds is pumped into the formation creating tiny fissures in targeted areas of the source rock. These tiny fissures allow oil and natural gas to escape and flow up to the surface. In Colorado, the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (COGCC) regulates the oil and gas industry and requires that all oil and natural gas producers disclose the chemicals and amount of water used in the process to FracFocus, a free, publicly accessible website.

Oil & Gas Development 101 – Frequently Asked Questions

What is hydraulic fracturing? Hydraulic fracturing or “fracking” is a proven technology used for over 60 years. When hydraulic fracturing begins, a mixture of mostly pressurized water, sand, and chemicals is pumped into the formation creating tiny fissures in targeted areas of the source rock. These tiny fissures allow oil and natural gas to escape and flow through piping up to the surface. The Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (COGCC) regulates the oil and gas industry and requires that all oil and natural gas producers disclose the chemicals and amount of water used in the process to FracFocus, a free, publicly access ... Read More »

Health Study Must be Scrutinized

 Statement from the Colorado Oil & Gas Association on Alleged Findings in CU School of Public Health Study:  “This is a very serious allegation. If you recall, Lisa McKenzie’s last major study in 2014 was disavowed by state health officials and in fact the state’s top health official went so far as to say the public could be “misled” by it. University researchers shouldn’t be in the game of scaring people just to secure additional funding. Still, public health is obviously of great concern to our industry and we will review her data immediately. We also look forward to the state’s review of the study.” *New* Stateme ...

Whitepaper: COGCC Oil and Gas Task Force Rulemaking Summary

On August 4, 2014, Governor John Hickenlooper announced the formation of an oil and gas development task force, which was established through Executive Order in September 2014. The 21-member Task Force convened monthly from September 2014 through February 2015. The Task Force put forth 9 recommendations. Two of the recommendations, numbers 17 and 20, which were unanimously approved, required a formal rulemaking of the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (COGCC) to implement. Recommendation 17 calls for the COGCC to define and adopt a process for improved local government involvement during the COGCC permitting process for Appli ... Read More »

Statement from Dan Haley, President and CEO, Colorado Oil and Gas Association on the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission’s rules from Governor Hickenlooper’s Oil and Gas Task Force:

January 25, 2016, Denver --- “Today, the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (COGCC) approved the final rules regarding the recommendations from the Governor’s Oil and Gas Task Force (TF). The task force and rulemaking process demonstrated a commitment to bringing all stakeholders together.” “From the announcement of the Governor’s Task Force in September of 2014, through 9 months of Task Force meetings, 4 days of COGCC hearings, and two workgroup meetings with the Department of Natural Resources, various Local Governments and citizens groups, to discuss the intent and implementation of Recommendation Nos. 17 and 20, ... Read More »

Haley: What the president should have said: ‘Thanks, fracking’

President Obama uttered 5,438 words during his hour-long State of the Union speech this month, but he forgot two: Thanks, fracking. In his final State of the Union speech, the president took credit for lower gasoline prices, for cutting our carbon dioxide emissions and for reducing our dependence on foreign oil. However, he completely failed to recognize how any of that took place. The shale revolution — our American energy renaissance — wasn’t mentioned once. He also blew his chance to thank the hundreds of thousands of men and women who work in the oil and gas industry in this country — an industry that helped pull the United S ... Read More »